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All & Everything Conference 2011

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The 16th International Humanities

All & Everything Conference 2011

Wednesday, 6 April to Sunday, 10 April 2011

=====================

Extol Inn Hotel

Pristavni 2

Prague 7

170 00

Czech Republic

 =====================

For full details go to: http://www.aandeconference.org

=====================

Written by SOPHIA WELLBELOVED

February 22, 2011 at 4:46 am

ALL & EVERYTHING 2011: 16th annual conference

ALL & EVERYTHING NEWSLETTER—CALL FOR PAPERS, CALL FOR SEMINARS

ANNOUNCING THE 16TH INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES CONFERENCE IN 2011

VENUE: Hotel Extol Inn, Prague, Pristavni 2, Prague 7, 17000, Czech Republic Wednesday,

DATES: 6th April – Sunday, 10th April 2011

A Gathering of the companions of the book, ‘All and Everything, Beelzebub’s Tales to His Grandson: A Totally Impartial Criticism of the Life of Man,’ G.I. Gurdjieff

THE ALL & EVERYTHING CONFERENCE:

Our Aim: the conference was originally conceived in 1996 as a meeting of the “Companions of the Book” and it has developed into a world forum for the presentation and discussion of recent writings, themes and music associated with the Work.

The conference provides an open, congenial and serious atmosphere for sharing research and investigation of G. I. Gurdjieff’s legacy. The conference seeks to keep the study of the teachings of Gurdjieff relevant to global, scientific, spiritual and sociological developments. This gathering is open to all serious students of All & Everything and is not under the auspices or sponsorship of any ‘Gurdjieff Group’ or umbrella organization. The conference is not intended to be a ‘Group Work Event’ and thus does not include Work on Movements or Exercises that are related to personal or group Work.

The conference includes the presentation of papers focused on the whole or part of this teaching, seminars on chapters, themes in All & Everything and cultural events. The program is scheduled so as to encourage time for dialogue and the developing of personal relationships outside the structured meetings.

DRAFT PROGRAM FOR ALL & EVERYTHING 2011

Wednesday Evening: Getting to know you session Thurs. Morning: Presentation of two papers, followed by discussions Afternoon Seminar: A chapter from Beelzebub’s Tales
Evening: Cultural Event
Friday Morning: Presentation of two papers, followed by discussions Afternoon Seminar: A chapter from Beelzebub’s Tales
Evening: open social evening
Saturday Morning: Presentation of two papers, followed by discussions Afternoon Seminar: A chapter from Meetings with Remarkable Men
Evening: Conference Banquet
Sunday Morning: Seminar: TBC
Closing Session: Where do we go from here? A conversation providing direction to the Planning Committee for future conferences.

CALL FOR PAPERS

ABSTRACTS – We are currently requesting submissions of abstracts for the papers that will be given at our next conference. Abstracts of accepted papers will be published in advance on the conference website so that delegates can prepare questions/comments. Writers who would like ongoing feedback should contact the Reading Panel.

Examples of previous papers as an indication of the variety of topics can be viewed here: http://www.aandeconference.org/reading-panel
The website is where all the contact and submission information is
provided: http://www.aandeconference.org/reading-panel
The submission form can be downloaded at:
http://www.aandeconference.org/Paper_Submission_Form_2011.pdf
and then submitted by email to: reading_panel@aandeconference.org <mailto:reading_panel@aandeconference.org?subject=Paper_Submission>

CALL FOR SEMINAR FACILITATORS FOR CHAPTER DISCUSSION

At each conference we hold seminars (questions, conversation,
dialogue) on chapters in The Tales and Meetings and other work related subjects. Our experience is also quite remarkable as we bring our questions and understandings to the group at the conference that is made up of various lineages in this teaching. This provides all in attendance to have an opportunity for a respectful and useful exchange of our understandings and experiences.

Facilitators need to have a working familiarity with the chapters or subjects that will be discussed. These facilitators are also responsible for the transcriptions of the seminar that they facilitate. The chapters for
2011 are 29, 32, 33, 34 in The Tales and in Meetings chapter 7, “Prince Yuri Lubovedsky.”

The website is where all the contact and submission information is
provided: http://www.aandeconference.org/seminar-panel
The submission form can be downloaded at:
www.aandeconference.org/Seminar_Submission_Form_2011.pdf
and then submitted by email to: info@aandeconference.org <mailto:info@aandeconference.org?subject=Seminar_Submission>

***
“Thanks to this, even the isolation of the inner life of each individual man is increased, and as a consequence what is called the “mutual instruction” so necessary to people’s collective existence is always more and more destroyed.”
– Beelzebub’s Tales, “From the Author,” page 1214
***

CONFERENCE REGISTRATION

Five day conference registration fee for Wednesday to Sunday is: £55 (approx CZK 1696, €67, $86) and due by March 1, 2010.
One day registration Fee is £14, (approx CZK 454, €18, $23)

The conference registration fee is payable directly to the A & E Conference and it is in addition to the hotel costs.

To make our administration much easier, please, if possible, register on-line with a credit card at our website: www.aandeconference.org/register

If this is not possible for you, you may register by post. Contact us at:
info@aandeconference.org <mailto:info@aandeconference.org?subject=Register>  and we will provide you a mailing address.
Please make checks payable to “All & Everything Conferences” with the form below or a photocopy.
……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
MAIL-IN REGISTRATION FORM – ALL & EVERYTHING 2011
Name: Phone:
Address:
City/State/County
Post Code Country:
Email:
5 Day Registration for person(s) @ £55, approx CZK1696, €67, $86
1 Day Registration for person(s) @ £14, approx CZK454, €18, $23 TOTAL (£) The Conference Registration Fee and Form are due by March 1, 2011.
Registrants will receive confirmation by email or post.
……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

***
“…I was composing in my thoughts the scheme and sequence of the ideas destined by me for publication and did not know then how to begin either?
“This sensation then experienced I might now formulate in words only thus: “the-fear-of-drowning-in-the-overflow-of-my-own-thoughts.”
“To stop this undesirable sensation I might then still have had recourse to the aid of that maleficent property existing also in me, as in contemporary man, which has become inherent in all of us, and which enables us, without experiencing any remorse of conscience whatever, to put off anything we wish to do “till tomorrow”.
– Beelzebub’s Tales, “The Arousing of Thought”, pages 4-5
***

HOTEL RESERVATION INFORMATION

Reservation Email: reservations@extolinn.cz <mailto:reservations@extolinn.cz?subject=Booking_for_A_and_E_Conference>

Please state that you are booking for the All & Everything Conference.

It is not too early to make reservations with the Hotel, and delegates are asked to book them early and directly with the hotel.
The A&E Conference cannot make reservations for delegates.

Extol Inn Hotel
Pristavni 2
Prague 7
170 00
Czech Republic
Reception tel./fax: +420 220 876 541
Reservations tel.: +420 220 802 549
Reservations fax.: +420 220 806 752
Contact Email: info@extolinn.cz
Website: http://www.extolinn.cz/english.html

HOTEL ROOM RATE ALL INCLUSIVE 4 NIGHTS (WED. EVE TO SUN. NOON)

single occupancy 3 star *** standard – CZK8685, £349, €286, $441 single occupancy 2 star ** – CZK7155, £236, €288, $364.
single occupancy 2 star ** economy-shared bath, CZK6415, £212, €258, $326 double occupancy 3 star *** – CZK 6585 per person, £ 217, € 265, $ 334 double occupancy 2 star ** – CZK 5815 per person, £ 192, € 234, $ 295 double occupancy 2 star ** economy – shared bath, CZK 5255 per person, £173, €211, $267

All options above include: “the postage,” conference facilities, breakfast, midmorning coffee, lunch, afternoon tea, three course dinner, and banquet dinner on Saturday evening.

NON-RESIDENT DAY ATTENDEES – HOTEL RATE PER DAY

Non-resident Day Attendee Hotel Conference Package Fee is: CZK 748, £ 25, € 30, $38 includes: mid-morning coffee, lunch, afternoon tea. (This is in addition to the day attendee registration fee listed above, and is payable directly to the Hotel, by the day attendee, when they sign in at the hotel front desk.)

PROCEEDINGS


The PDF eBooks versions of the 1998 and 2001 Proceedings are now available from our website at:
http://www.aandeconference.org/proceedings-overview

NEWSLETTER

A PDF printable version of this newsletter, suitable for distribution to your local group or community, is available at:
http://www.aandeconference.org/A&E_2011_Call_For_Papers.pdf
Please share this announcement with any like minded people you know.

ALL & EVERYTHING CONFERENCE MAILING LIST

If you lead or facilitate a Gurdjieff group and would like to recommend any colleagues to receive a copy of this newsletter and subsequent invitations, please email your request to us. If you wish to have your contact information updated, please email your request to us at:
info@aandeconference.org <mailto:info@aandeconference.org?subject=Add_or_Update_Email>

IF YOU WISH TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM A MAILING LIST,

Please email info@aandeconference.org <mailto:info@aandeconference.org?subject=Unsubscribe>  with “Unsubscribe” as the subject line.

Written by SOPHIA WELLBELOVED

September 14, 2010 at 9:46 am

Cosmology conference: Indian Institute of Science Bangalore India

Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India

http://www.cosmicmanifest.org/content/index.php for full details

National Institute of Advanced Studies
Indian Institute of Science Campus (IISC)
Bangalore, India

For the first time ever, Scientists and Cosmologists come together to share notes of their expressions on Ancient Wisdom and Modern Science.

Cosmology has always been a dramatic expression of mankind’s grasp of Scientific and Spiritual Insights. Every great Civilisation has had its own perspective on the Cosmos.

Mayan (Peru, Guatemala, Mexico), Aztec (Colombian), Inca (Peru, Ecuador, Chile, Bolivia), Greco-Roman, African (Zulu, Kamitic), Chinese, Buddhist, Hindu, are some of the major Civilisational Cosmologies. As assumed that these Cosmologies were largely based on observations, intuitions and mathematical derivations over the millennia, for a long time, the contributions had been considered as fantastic mythologies, by Scientists.

Date            : December 2-4, 2010

Venue          : National Institute of Advanced Studies (NIAS)
Indian Institute of Science campus (IISc), BENGALURU, India

Organizers : Srinivas Jyothish Vigyan Research Foundation,
Tiruchirapalli, Ind

Date            : December 2-4, 2010

Venue         : National Institute of Advanced Studies (NIAS)
Indian Institute of Science campus (IISc), BENGALURU, India

Themes

Universe and the Solar System (Origin, Extent, Structure and the Future)

Geocentric and Heliocentric Philosophy (Locations of the Planets, Aspects,

Latitudes and Longitudes and the Significance)

Cosmic Energy Systems and Energy Transfers (impacts on the world systems, humans, human health and human coexistence)

Techniques of Time Measurement, Evolution of Time and Calendars

Earth Processes, Disasters and Climatic Change

Esoteric Cosmology and Human Development

Theosophy and Anthroposophy

Metaphysics and Modern Science

Effects on Cosmology and Health

Cosmology and Social Orde

=====================

Written by SOPHIA WELLBELOVED

July 31, 2010 at 7:16 pm

2010 ALL & EVERYTHING CONFERENCE

gurdjieff

G. I. Gurdjieff (1866? – 1949)

Announcing the 15th International Humanities Conference with program update

THE ALL & EVERYTHING CONFERENCE: WHAT IT IS AND IS NOT
The All & Everything Conference was originally conceived in 1996 as a meeting of the “Companions of the Book.” The conference has developed into a world forum that provides an open, congenial and serious atmosphere for the sharing of research and investigation of G. I. Gurdjieff’s literary legacy. The Conference seeks to keep the study of the teachings of Gurdjieff relevant to global, scientific, spiritual and sociological developments. The gathering is open to all serious students of All & Everything and is not under the auspices or sponsorship of any ‘Gurdjieff Group’ or umbrella organization. The Conference is not intended to be a ‘Group Work Event’ and thus does not include Work on Movements or Exercises that are related to personal or group Work. The Conference includes the presentation of academic papers, individual view papers, seminars on chapters and themes in All & Everything, and cultural events. The program is scheduled so as to encourage time for dialogue and the developing of personal relationships outside the structured meetings.

View the complete Conference Charter on our website:
http://www.aandeconference.org/faq.html

DATES
Wednesday, 24 March – Sunday, 28 March, 2010

*******

LOCATION
Hotel Pappas
Loutraki of Korinthia
Peloponnese, Greece
Tel. (0030) 27440/62782-4, 23936-8
Fax. (0030) 27440/23940
Email: pappasae@otenet.gr
Website: http://www.hotelpappas.gr/reservation.htm

*******

HOTEL RESERVATION INFORMATION
Bookings can be made by phone or via the Hotel website (see above).
Delegates are asked to book reservations early and directly with the hotel.

NOTE: The A&E Conference does NOT make hotel reservations for delegates.

HOTEL ROOM RATE PER DAY
Single – €55 per person per day (approximate rate on publish date: £47, US$78, CAD$84)
Double – €42 per person per day (approximate rate on publish date: £36, US$60, CAD$64)
Includes: Breakfast, Mid-Morning Coffee, Lunch, Afternoon Tea, full Dinners, and Banquet Dinner on Saturday evening.

*******

CONFERENCE REGISTRATION FEES
5 Day Registration Fee is £50 per person.
(approximate rate on publish date: €58, US$83, CAD$90)
The Conference Registration Fees are due by February 1, 2010.
All registrants will receive confirmation by email or post.

ONLINE REGISTRATION
You may Register on-line with a credit card at our website:
http://www.aandeconference.org/register_online.html

MAIL-IN REGISTRATION FORM
A print and post Registration Form is available to download from our website:

Click to access register2010.pdf

*******
Schedule of Seminars and Discussions

Wednesday
8:30 PM – Informal Session: Getting to Know You

Thursday
8:00 – Voluntary Sitting / Meditation
9:15 – Opening Remarks
9:30 – Stephen Aronson: Egoism and Compassion: A Higher Perspective
10:45 – Coffee Break
11:15 – Paper: Dimitri Peretzi: The Structure of Laws presented in the Tales
12:30 – Lunch
2:30 – Seminar 1: Ch. 31 of Beelzebub’s Tales – The Sixth and Last Sojourn of Beelzebub on the Planet Earth, facilitated by Terje Tonne
3:45 – Coffee Break
4:15 – Seminar 1: continued
Evening open for socializing

Friday
8:00 – Voluntary Sitting / Meditation
9:30 – Paper: Sy Ginsburg: There is in our Life a Certain Very Great Purpose
10:45 – Coffee Break
11:15 – Paper: Andreas Zarkadoulas & Anestis Christoforides: The Autonomous Nervous System in Ideas of Gurdjieff and Modern Neurophysiology
12:30 – Lunch
2:30 – Seminar 2: Ch. 6 of Meetings with Remarkable Men – Abram Yelov facilitated by Ian MacFarlane
3:45 – Coffee Break
4:15 – Seminar 2: Continued
8:30 – Cultural Event: RODA Musical Presentation

Saturday
8:00 – Voluntary Sitting / Meditation
9:30 – Paper: Clare Mingins: The Two Chief Motors of our Existence: Food and Sex
10:45 – Coffee Break
11:15 – Paper: Arkady Rovner: The Gurdjieff Tradition – To Be Continued
12:30 – Lunch
2:30 – Seminar 3: Popi Asteri – Men N1, N2, N3, N4… and N7 in Beelzebub’s Tales
3:45 – Coffee Break
4:15 – Seminar 4: Mike Readshaw – To take the wrong road can be almost as long as a short cut – Or, what was Gurdjieff really doing?
7:30 – Conference Banquet

Sunday
8:00 – Voluntary Sitting / Meditation
9:30 – Seminar 5: Where Do We Go From Here

*******

Keep up to date on activities and changes at the conference website:
http://www.aandeconference.org

*******

Examples of previous papers as an indication of the variety of topics:
1996 – James Moore, A Reflection on the Obligolnian Strivings
1997 – Paul Beekman Taylor, Deconstruction of History in the Third Series
1998 – Harry Bennett, Approaching the Neologisms of the First Series
1999 – Dr. Keith Buzzell, The Biological Foundations of the Sacred Impulses
2000 – Dr. Sophia Wellbeloved, Numbers, the Zodiac and The Tales
2001 – Wim Van Dullemen, Principles of Gurdjieff’s Movements
2002 – Ana Fragomeni, Triads and Laws
2003 – Dimitri Peretzi, On the Third Line of Work
2004 – Terje Tonne, Art and the Six Processes
2005 – Sy Ginsburg, Gurdjieff and the Study of Dreams
2006 – Prof. M. W. Thring, The Message of Ashiata Shiemash
2007 – Jose Tirado, Beelzebub’s Buddhas
2008 – Anthony Blake, Beelzebub in a Ring
2009 – James George, What Does Great Nature Now Require Of Us?

CALL FOR PAPERS
You are invited to submit a paper relevant to the study of Gurdjieff’s literary heritage for consideration for A&E 2010. Time: 1 hour – approx 30 minutes for the paper and 30 minutes for questions and answers.
Deadline for submission of an abstract is 1st November 2009.

PAPER SUBMISSION & PUBLISHING RIGHTS RELEASE FORM
The paper submission form may be downloaded from our website:

Click to access Paper_Submission_Form_2010.pdf


The form includes submission guidelines for abstracts and papers as well as style guidelines for printed copy. Please note that you will be expected to transcribe the questions and answers for inclusion in the published proceedings. An audio MP3 CD of the recorded session is provided for that purpose.

CALL FOR SEMINAR FACILITATORS
You are invited to volunteer to facilitate a seminar on one of the book chapters listed above in the Draft Program for 2010 or one seminar on Sunday morning on a topic that you suggest.
Time: 1 hour 15 minutes – approx 15 minutes for your introduction and 1 hour for open discussion.
Deadline for submission of an abstract is 1st November 2009.

SEMINAR SUBMISSION & PUBLISHING RIGHTS RELEASE FORM
The seminar submission form may be downloaded from our website:

Click to access Seminar_Submission_Form_2010.pdf


The form includes submission guidelines for seminar introductions as well as style guidelines for printed copy. Please note that you will be expected to provide a written copy of your introduction as well as to transcribe the discussion period for inclusion in the published proceedings. An audio MP3 CD of the recorded session is provided for that purpose.

*******

PROCEEDINGS

The Proceedings of the 14th All & Everything Conference will soon be available.
Printed copies can be purchased from: http://www.amazon.com
ISBN: 9781905578269
The downloadable PDF eBook version will be available to purchase at our website:
http://www.aandeconference.org/proceedings2009.html

Printed versions of past Proceedings are available from Amazon.com.
Ebook versions of past Proceedings are available for purchase and download at our website:
http://www.aandeconference.org/proceedings.html

*******

2009 A&E CONFERENCE HOTEL & PROGARAMME

toronto_trump_tower_large

THE 14TH INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES CONFERENCE – ALL & EVERYTHING 2009
———————————————————————————————
Wednesday, 22 April to Sunday, 26 April

at:

DAYS HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTRE
1677 WILSON AVE
TORONTO, ONTARIO, M3L 1A5
CANADA

Tel: +01 416 249-8171 (1-800-267-0997)
Fax: +01 416 243-7342
E-Mail: info@daysto.com
Website: http://www.daysto.com


If you would like to attend and do not have an invitation
you should email
info@aandeconference.org
and ask for an invitation.
—————————————-
CONFERENCE REGISTRATION FEES
—————————————-

Five day registration fee: $ CAD 80 (approx £ 45, E 50, US$ 65) per person.
Per day registration fee: $ CAD 27 (approx £ 15, E 17, US$ 22) per person.

NOTE: Please pay the registration fee in advance to the A&E Conference. You may register and pay online by credit card or PayPal, or send cheque by post. The conference registration fees are due by March 1, 2009.

——————————————
HOTEL RESERVATION INFORMATION
——————————————
Bookings can be made by phone or via their website.
Delegates are asked to book their reservations early and directly with the hotel.
The A&E Conference does NOT make reservations for delegates.
Hotel reservations are separate from Conference registration and must be made directly with the hotel.

Airport shuttle service available for overnight hotel guests.

——————————————————-
HOTEL RESIDENTIAL ROOM RATES PER DAY
——————————————————-
$99 CAD (approx $81 USD, £55, €63 ) per room (single / double occupancy)
plus $38 CAD (approx. $31 USD, £21, €24) Conference Package per person.
Includes: Breakfast, mid-morning coffee, Lunch, afternoon tea.
Not Included: Daily Dinner, and Banquet Dinner on Saturday evening.

—————————————————-
HOTEL NON-RESIDENTIAL CONFERENCE RATES
—————————————————-
In addition to the per day Conference registration fee, the following Hotel conference package fee will apply to day delegates:
Per day hotel conference package fee is: $38 CAD (approx £ 21, E 24, US$ 31)
Includes: mid-morning coffee, lunch, afternoon tea.
The hotel requires that day delegates sign-in at the front desk and pay the conference package fee.

More information is available at the All and Everything Conference website: http://www.aandeconference.org

—————————————————-
SCHEDULE OF SEMINARS AND DISCUSSIONS
—————————————————-
Each day: 8:00 voluntary sitting / meditation

WED, April 22

20:30 Informal Session: Getting to Know You

THU, April 23 9:15 Opening Remarks

9:30 Stephen Aronson-Preparation for the Third Line of Work
10:45 Coffee Break
11:15 Paper: Dimitri Peretzi: Man is Third Force Blind
12:30 Lunch
14:30 Seminar 1: Ch. 25 of Beelzebub’s Tales – Ashiata Shiemash, Sent from Above
15:45 Coffee Break
16:15 Seminar 2: Ch. 26 of Beelzebub’s Tales – The Terror-of-the-Situation
20:30 TBC: Piano recital of Gurdjieff/de Hartmann music

FRI, April 24

9:30 John Amaral – Gurdjieff Exercises and Three Brains
10:45 Coffee Break
11:15 Keith Buzzell – Do-Re-Mi of Food, Air and Impressions
12:30 Lunch
14:30 Seminar 3: Ch. 27 of Beelzebub’s Tales – Organization for Man’s Existence
15:45 Coffee Break
16:15 Seminar 4: Ch. 28 of Beelzebub’s Tales – Destruction of the Labors of Ashiata Shiemash
20:30 TBC: Talk & Piano recital of Gurdjieff/Hartmann music: Elan Sicroff

SAT, APRIL 25

9:30 George Bennett – Being-Partkdolg-duty, Conscious Labor and Intentional Suffering
10:45 Coffee Break
11:15 James George – What Does Great Nature Now Require of Us?
12:30 Lunch
14:30 Seminar 5: Ch. 5 of Meetings with Remarkable Men – Mr. X or Captain Pogossian
15:45 Coffee Break
16:15 Seminar 6: Dorothy Usiskin – Egoism
19:30 Conference Banquet: Speaker – John Robert Colombo

SUN, APRIL 26
9:30 Seminar 7 – Where Do We Go From Here?

————————————————
ABSTRACTS AND PRESENTERS RESUMES
————————————————
Abstracts of the Papers and Presenter Resumes are available to view on our website: http://www.aandeconference.org/abstracts_2008.html

The Proceedings of the 13th All & Everything Conference are available to purchase from Amazon.com. ISBN: 9781905578122

—————————————————————————————–
THE ALL & EVERYTHING HUMANITIES CONFERENCE: WHAT IT IS AND IS NOT
—————————————————————————————–

The All & Everything Conference was originally conceived in 1996
as a meeting of the ‘Companions of the Book’. The conference has
developed into a world forum for the presentation and discussion
of recent writings, themes and music associated with the Work.

The Conference provides an open, congenial and serious atmosphere
for the sharing of research and investigation of G. I. Gurdjieff’s legacy.
The Conference seeks to keep the study of the teachings of Gurdjieff
relevant to global, scientific, spiritual and sociological developments.

The gathering is open to all serious students of All & Everything and is not under the auspices or sponsorship of any Gurdjieff Group or umbrella organization. The Conference is not intended to be a ‘Group Work Event’ and thus does not include Work on Movements or Exercises that are related to personal or group Work.

The Conference includes the presentation of academic papers, individual view papers, seminars on chapters and themes in All & Everything, and cultural events.

email
info@aandeconference.org

————————————————–

Written by SOPHIA WELLBELOVED

February 6, 2009 at 7:54 pm

5th ARMENIA-GURDJIEFF CONFERENCE 2009

armenia

5th Armenia-Gurdjieff Conference Location: Armenia
Call for Papers Date: 2009-02-01 (in 8 days)
Date Submitted: 2008-11-30
Announcement ID: 165481

Paper proposals are invited for a conference entitled

The Life and Work of G.I. Gurdjieff

To be held 26-28 June 2009 in Yerevan, Armenia. Scholars and Presenters are invited to examine the various dimensions of the life and thought of G.I. Gurdjieff, and in particular the Armenian and Caucasian roots of his work.

Deadline for proposal submissions: 1 March 2009
Location: Yerevan, Armenia, June 26-28, 2009

Conference Theme: While many works have been written about his life and work, few have addressed the Caucasian and specifically Armenian character of his work. Further, even though Gurdjieff is known outside of the Caucasus, many Armenians remain unfamiliar with him. Building upon the success of the first two conferences, this conference will continue to take steps in redressing these imbalances. This year we hope to present a more in-depth three day conference in which presentations and discussions will take place that investigate Gurdjieff, his life, his work, as well as his ideas. In particular, we hope to highlight and explore the roots of his identity and his role as an important philosopher and thinker of Armenia and the Caucasus. We hope to introduce Gurdjieff to a wider, as well as local, audience and to present and discuss various aspects of his life and teaching. As a result of the conference we hope to form a bridge of exchange that will serve both the local communities and global community that holds an interest in Gurdjieff. By holding the conference in the very heart of Gurdjieff’s homeland, we hope to make new global connections to the Caucasus, a project that has only become possible since Armenia’s break from the Soviet Union.

Paper Proposals: Proposals addressing Gurdjieff’s thought and cultural identity and aspects of the cultures that influenced his ideas, teaching and writing are welcomed. However, papers are particularly encouraged that undertake original research speaking to one or more of the following areas of inquiry.

1. Gurdjieff’s Influence in Contemporary Culture
2. Gurdjieff’s Caucasian and/or Armenian Identity
3. Gurdjieff’s Writings: Language and Terminology
4. Gurdjieff’s “Toast of the Idiots”
5. Gurdjieff and Ethics

Scholars, researchers and students interested in presenting papers at the conference should send a paper proposal of not more than 500 words and a short CV, by e-mail to the conference coordinator: Michael Pittman. The working languages of the conference will be English and Armenian – there will be simultaneous translation. The deadline for the submission of paper proposals is 1 Feb 2009. Authors of the paper selected for the conference will be notified by 1 March 2009.

***Participants MUST submit the full text of their respective papers to the conference organizers by 5 June 2009 (4 weeks before the conference), otherwise the opportunity to participate in the conference may be forfeited.

It is anticipated that the conference papers will be published as a volume. Unless otherwise agreed in writing, the conference organizers will have first option on all papers presented at the conference, and will let participants know by 1 December 2009 whether they will exercise that option.

Informal preliminary inquiries regarding paper submissions are welcome and may be directed to the conference coordinator, Michael Pittman at: michael.pittman@acphs.edu

Michael Pittman
Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences
106 New Scotland Ave.
Albany, New York 12208
Email: michael.pittman@acphs.edu
Visit the website at http://armeniagurdjieff.org

Written by SOPHIA WELLBELOVED

January 24, 2009 at 9:30 pm

GURDJIEFF AS MAGUS: IMPORTANT OMISSION & ADDITION

G. I. Gurdjieff

The paper Gurdjieff as Magus: Omissions and Redefinitions of the Work
given by Sophia Wellbeloved at the
Association for the Study of Esotericism’s Third International Conference
at the College of Charleston, South Carolina in June 2008 was posted without any references to the sources.

The sources have now been added in the body of the text. We are grateful to the person who drew our attention to this by emailing to ask where he could find the Solita Solano Notes. They are in the Library of Congress, and the precise details are now in the post as well as all the other references to the texts consulted for the paper.

Written by SOPHIA WELLBELOVED

July 10, 2008 at 7:24 am

2009: 14th ALL & EVERYTHING INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES CONFERENCE

Toronto

THE 14TH ALL & EVERYTHING INTERNATIONAL HUMANITIES CONFERNCE

will take place in:

Toronto, Canada – Wednesday, 22 April to Sunday, 26 April 2009

The ALL & EVERYTHING Conference provides an open, congenial & serious atmosphere for the sharing of researches and investigations of G. I. Gurdjieff’s legacy. The Conference seeks to keep the study of the teachings of Gurdjieff relevant to global scientific, spiritual and sociological developments. The Conference includes the presentation of academic papers, individual view papers, seminars on chapters and themes in All & Everything, and relevant cultural events.

The gathering is open by invitation to all serious students of All & Everything. The Conference is not intended to be a ‘Group Work event’ and thus does not include work on Movements or on exercises that are related to personal or group Work. The program is scheduled so as to encourage time for dialogue and the developing of personal relationships outside the structured meetings.

A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE CONFERENCE
Originally conceived as a congenial meeting of the “Companions of the Book” in 1996, the conference has developed into a world forum for the presentation and discussion of recent writings, themes and music associated with the Work and writing of G. I. Gurdjieff. Conferences have been held in the UK, USA, Greece and the Netherlands.

See http://www.aandeconference.org
for full details of
venue
call for papers
past papers

STATEMENT ON INDEPENDENCE OF THE ALL AND EVERYTHING CONFERENCE
The All and Everything Conferences are totally non-sectarian, and not presented under the auspices or sponsorship of any Gurdjieff Group or umbrella organization. The Conferences are and will remain entirely independent. They are organized by a volunteer Planning Committee of students from many countries, supported by a diverse volunteer Advisory Board composed of academics and prominent students of Gurdjieff’s teaching. The composition of the Planning Committee and of the Advisory Board varies from year to year.

No individuals, groups or umbrella organizations are permitted to exercise influence over the conference programme or to make use of its facilities. No participant has any authority to impose his or her views or opinions on any other participant; all participants have an equal right to hold their own particular views and opinions. All participants are encouraged to exercise their right of liberty of thought and of expression within the limits of orderliness and courtesy to others.

****************************************************************************

“And all cosmic truths usually become known to all on these planets, thanks to the fact that the beings of the given planet who by their conscious labors learn some truth or other share it with other beings of their planet, and in this way all the cosmic truths gradually become known by all the beings of the given planet without any distinction.” (All and Everything, “An Objectively Impartial Criticism of the Life of Man,” or, “Beelzebub’s Tales to His Grandson.” p. 563)

GURDJIEFF IN TIFLIS:TBILISI CONFERENCE 2007

This book includes material from the International Conference ‘G. I. Gurdjieff from South Caucasus to Wetern World His Influence onf Spirituality, Thought and Culture in Italy Europe and the USA’ which was held in TbIlisi on 7th March 2007.

PUblished by Shota Rustaveli Theatre and Film University, it has 90 pages and can be ordered from the Stichting Caucasus Foundation through the email:

scf@caucasusfoundation.ge

It contains contributions from Massimo Introvigne, Fabrizio Romano, PierLuigi Zoccatelli, Constance Jones, Manana Khomeriki, Claudio Gugerotti, Janri Kachia and Alexander Cherkezishvili.

GURDJIEFF AS MAGUS OMISSIONS AND REDEFINITIONS OF THE WORK

The College of Charleston

This paper given by Sophia Wellbeloved at the Association for the Study of Esotericism’s
Third International Conference
at the College of Charleston, South Carolina in June 2008, is one of five papers given relating to Gurdjieff. The others were given by Michael Pittman, Joseph Azize, Richard Smoley and Jon Woodson, to see the full program copy and paste this link:
http://www.cofc.edu/ase//program.html to see the full programme.

‘Gurdjieff as Magus’ looks at G. I. Gurdjieff (1866?-1949) in his role as a magus. He taught pupils the acquisition of will, use of symbolism, inter-relationship of macrocosmos to microcosmos and a manipulation of cosmic laws so as to form a set of new bodies of ever finer materiality and longevity. It shows the centrality of hypnotism to his teaching about consciousness and how hypnotic techniques function in his texts and oral teachings. Gurdjieff used the imagery of black and white magic and reflects the roles of both black and white magician, using alcohol, drugs and intense pressures to entangle pupils usually for short periods of time. Lastly we will look at how the teaching has become institutionalised, necessitating omissions and redefinitions of both Gurdjieff and the Work.

Gurdjieff as Magus: Omissions and Redefinitions of the Work

Gurdjieff is not an easy man to define, and we are not going to attempt to impose a fixed definition of him here. What we are going to look at is:

1.
How he presented himself in his writings

2.
How he presented himself to his pupils in his oral teachings

3.
Present day omissions and redefinitions of the Work

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1.
Gurdjieff as Hypnotist

Gurdjieff was known as a hypnotist who cared for and cured drink and drug dependency and other conditions, a role which he regarded as separate from his role as a teacher and which he continued throughout his life, (Peters 1977: 214, 220-223. Webb: 1980, 473).

Now we will look at how Gurdjieff presented himself in his texts in relation to hypnotism. You can see below the full titles and the abbreviations I am going to use when I refer to the texts
————————————–

GURDJIEFF’S TEXTS

HERALD
The Herald of Coming Good, privately published Paris, 1933

TALES
First series: An Objectively Impartial Criticism of the Life of Man or Beelzebub’s Tales to His Grandson, London: Routledge & Keegan Paul, 1950

MEETINGS
Second series: Meetings With Remarkable Men, trans. A. R. Orage, Londond: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1963

LIFE
Third series: Life is real only then, when “I am”, New York: Duton for Triangle Editions, 1975

———————————————-

In all these writings Gurdjieff refers to hypnotism; in the Tales, the two central chapters are devoted to the practice of hypnotism, in these Gurdjieff’s life story merges with that of his hero Beelzebub. Mesmer is perhaps the only historical person mentioned in the Tales who is not vilified by Beelzebub (Tales: 561-2). In the other three ‘autobiographical’ works he gives examples of practicing hypnotism himself (Meetings: 197-98, Life: 25, Herald: 11-13, see also Wellbeloved 2003:100-02). Herald focuses almost exclusively on his study of hypnotism and other occult practises.

Gurdjieff’s represents hypnotism in both passive and active functions

————————————————–

WAKING (hypnotic) SLEEP
(our usual waking state)

HYPNOTISM(can function passively or actively)

SUBCONSCIOUS
(usually inaccessible to us but made accessible by hypnosis )

———————————————–

We can relate hypnotism to the central tenet of Gurdjieff’s teaching. He taught that what we usually regard as being our daily waking state is in fact a state of sleep. Not ordinary sleep but hypnotic sleep.

In brief summary: our ‘true’ consciousness resides in what he terms the ‘subconscious’ which we are usually unable to contact. As a result of this division in our consciousness, he says that, as we are, we cannot ‘do’, our actions are merely mechanical reactions.

In Chapter XXXII of the Tales Beelzebub explains that hypnotism is the means of linking these two states of being. It can be used to act on these separated consciousnesses in different ways, for example, it can put the usual waking state, where the personality functions to sleep so that the subconscious which contains the essence can function. The advantage of doing that is that according to the teaching essence can grow and develop while the personality is a prison in which we respond mechanically to what ever happens.

So we can see that a passive experience of hypnotism, being hypnotised by events or surroundings, may function to trap us in ‘waking sleep’, while an active hypnotism, may liberate us from waking sleep and give us access to our subconscious.

Hypnotism in Gurdjieff’s terminology is thus ‘a stick with two ends.’

——————-

Here I want to look at Gurdjieff’s four texts in relation to his law of three which expresses two possible outcomes for the interaction of negative and positive forces. Hypnotism is the third force that can reconcile these forces in an evolutionary/positive way, or in a devolutionary/negative way.

The diagram below show how Gurdjieff’s texts embody his law of three.

————————————

+ LIFE
Results from reconciliation in an evolutionary/upwards direction

– TALES Hypnotism is the third force capable of reconciling positive and negative forces + MEETINGS

– HERALD
Results from reconciliation in devolutionary/downwards direction

——————————————————-

We can regard each text as representing a positive or negative force according to Gurdjieff’s own intention for the books stated in the following way:

The Tales – functions as a negative force intended to destroy the reader’s beliefs and views
Meetings – functions as a positive force – because it is to provide the reader with good material for a new creation.

Life – functions as a result of an evolutionary reconciling force – because it is to help the reader realise the world existing in reality rather than in his fantasy.

Herald – functions as the result of a devolutionary reconciling force, this is the book that Gurdjieff withdrew or ‘exiled’.

In the two books which show how the positive and negative are resolved Gurdjieff presents himself as a predominantly wise white magician in Life, and the personification of a psychotic, black magician in Herald.

Gurdjieff instructed his pupils not to read Herald, but writes in Life, that we ought not to read it. This is not a convincing strategy for someone who wants his book to be ignored. Herald shows the chaotic state of a devolutionary descent in to madness, and it is necessary to include it in order to show the full expression of his law of three.

Gurdjieff employed hypnotic techniques in all these texts. Some of these are defined by Dr Joseph A. Sandford a psychologist and clinical hypnotheapist with Gurdjieffian interests and professionally trained in the hypnosis methodology of Milton H. Erickson. Sandford gives some examples of the hypnotic techniques that are used by both men: ‘story telling, metaphor, indirect suggestion, confusion techniques and implied directives, and shocks (Gnosis through Hypnosis: the Role of Trance in Personal Transformation, Proceedings of the All & Everything Humantities Conference,2005, privately published. See also (Runyon, Carroll, Magick and Hypnosis). http://nightbreed.tribe.net/thread/33226a91-c71c-49f4-90dd-dd1f0c997091 ‘<em>Ceremonial magic is ritual hypnosis’).

Gurdjieff himself said that breaking the connection between the emotional and mental centres will cause a person to become hallucinated (Gurdjieff, 1976: 263, 192), ‘Centres are without critical faculty … when a person looks with one centre only, he is under hallucination’). All his texts are intentionally confusing: misleading, contradictory, and paradoxical, he defined himself as:

‘unique in respect of the so to say “muddling and befuddling” of all the notions and convictions supposedly firmly fixed in the entirety of people with whom I come into contact.” (Tales, 26).

2.
Now we will look at how Gurdjieff presented himself to his pupils.
Gurdjieff’s teaching emphasised specific methodologies according to where he was and what was happening, but the content of the teaching remained the same in all periods. Here, because of time constraints, we will look at two periods indicated in the chronology below.

—————————————————

G. I. GURDJIEFF 1866? – 1949

1866? Born Alexandropol, Armenia, (now Gyumri)

1885?- 1910? Undocumented travels to Middle and Far East

1910? – 1917 In Russia teaching: P. D. Ouspensky meets Gurdjieff
records teaching from 1915 – 1922
In Search of the Miraculous (Search) Ouspensky 1949

1917 – 1922 From Russia to Europe with pupils

1922 France: Gurdjieff founds The Institute for the Harmonious
Development of Man outside Paris,
fully functional until 1924

1924 -1930 Visits USA begins writing. Closes the Institute but
continues to live there. Will visit the USA a further
nine or ten times.

1932 lives in Paris

1935 – 1940 Paris teaching the Rope group [and others].

1940-1945 Teaching groups in his flat in Paris

1945 Gurdjieff continued teaching pupils until his death in
1949.

———————————————————

P. D. Ouspensky

1915-1922
During this time Ouspensky records Gurdjieff’s teaching pupils: the acquisition of will, the use of symbolism, the inter-relationship of macrocosmos to microcosmos and a manipulation of cosmic laws so as to form a set of new bodies of ever finer materiality and longevity. Gurdjieff expressed his teachings with reference to alchemical processes, (Search,176, 180), transmutation and transformation (Search,193), and in relation to the symbologies of astrology, magic and tarot, among others (Search, 278-295) and Webb, (The Harmonious Circle 1980, 499-525) gives a good account of some of the likely western esoteric origins of Gurdjieff’s teaching (Webb, 1980, 499-525).

Many if not most of Gurdjieff’s pupils had some knowledge of Theosophical ideas, so his cosmology, ideas about the formation of different bodies would have been familiar to them. What Gurdjieff offered pupils that differed from Blavatksy’s Theosophical teaching was an occult practice that would enable them to transform themselves, not just a theory about different bodies but methods for creating them. This brings Gurdjieff’s teaching into the realm of magic (Versluis, Arthur, 2007: 1. ‘Magicians seek direct spiritual insight and use it to affect the course of events’, and 4. ‘the Magus seeks to have effects in the world’.)

Gurdjieff defines magicians as men who understand the laws of nature and know how to use them to transform substances and also to oppose mechanical influences, and this is not a bad summary of what Gurdjieff himself taught. He gives Christ as an example of a magician who had this knowledge (Search: 226-7, see also (Views 1976/ 1st pub 1973 in a talk in Essentuki in 1918). Gurdjieff’s definitions of both black and white magicians are inconsistent and confusing (Search: 227). He does say that ‘Black magic does not in any way mean magic of evil’ and this is representative of a theme he returns to throughout his teaching. The pupils who took part in his revue ‘Struggle of the Magicians’, had to dance the roles of both black and white magicians.
Gurdjieff agrees with Ouspensky that narcotics are used for the creation of states that make magic possible, but says that they are not merely narcotics although substances used may be prepared form opium or hashish (Search: 8-9 see also 162, 195).

There is a short paper on Narcotics and Hormones by G. I. Gurdjieff, ‘evidently taken down by Ouspensky’. Here Gurdjieff relates some of the uses of narcotics including as a help in ‘the work of Self-Observation and self study,’ he stresses that the use of narcotics is dangerous and needs to be carried out by an expert.

In 1959 the Stourton Press in Cape Town published a short paper Narcotics and Hormones by G. I. Gurdjieff, ‘evidently taken down by Ouspensky’, some of the material is in his In Search of the Miraculous. Republished in Unforgotten Fragments, Pogson, Beryl Chassereau, and Lewis Creed, 1994. Gurdjieff states that narcotics can be used to change the state of consciousness. He refers to medieval literature as a rich source on the subject. He defines hormones as ‘clouds of fine matter, finer than the gaseous matter known to us which is given off by various organs of our body. The 1920s and 1930s were a time of great interest and medical research into hormones. In 1922 insulin was first used to treat diabetes, (see also http://www.uwyo.edu/wjm/Repro/classica.htm) There are references to opium in the Tales including an complex passage pages 826-40 detailing research into the properties of opium).

———————————————–

Solita Solano

1935 -1939/40
Gurdjieff was teaching’ the Rope’ a group of women pupils in Paris, seeing them once or twice every day. According to Gurdjieff’s pupil J. G Bennett this group progressed at a much faster rate than earlier pupils, Bennett attributed this to the use of drugs (Bennett 1976: 232), Bennett writes that Gurdjieff carried out ‘a very extraordinary experiment, making use of methods that brought them into remarkable psychic states, and developed their powers far more rapidly’ than those of earlier pupils. He saw memoirs but is not allowed to quote from them, he hopes they will be published as they throw light on Gurdjieff’s methods as a teacher and upon ‘his use of drugs as a method of developing not only psychic experiences, but also opening hidden channels of the human psyche’. Although he was castigated for making this suggestion, there are diary entries concerning courses of injections, which Gurdjieff himself gave to the pupils, recorded in:

Notes taken by Solita Solano from October 1935 – April 1939 in Paris, with additional notes about Gurdjieff’s visit to New York in 1948
(Janet Flanner and Solita Solano Papers, Library of Congress, folder 6 box 6).

There are twenty-three direct references to piqures (injections) and courses of injections that Gurdjieff gave Solano and other members of the Rope group. He gave inner exercises for them to do related to the injections.

Solano quotes Gurdjieff saying:

‘After a certain age this effort [his teaching] is very difficult and often impossible. There is an artificial aid by means of physico-chemical substance… for example a substance can be injected which will furnish artificial help for prayer … If the effort and the amount of the chemical are not balanced, it becomes a dangerous poison for the organism.’ (In January, 1936, p. 18).

He had already given her ‘My first piqure and my first exercise’ (16th November 1935).

These notes are greatly abridged and there is no mention of the actual substances he was injecting, but he did take blood and urine samples from the group to check what adjustments to make to their medications. The exercises are not give in the Notes, and the results of the injections are not referred to in detail, Solano reports feeling better after the first course. Later the group are strongly affected by the injections, two of them cry and feel suicidal, Solano fears loosing her memory. Another time she asks about an increase in menstruation which Gurdjieff attributes to the injections this last suggests injections of hormones (Notes 39-40).

The group also take other medicines given them by Gurdjieff (Notes July 18, 1936, 42-43).

There are references to magic, in the first (June 18th 1936) Gurdjieff refers to ‘the mag’, Solano writes in brackets after mag ( magus, adept, master) and says that

The mag (magus, adept, master) is cunning.

… The mag is the highest that man can approach to God because only he can be impartial and fulfil obligation to God. In old times the mag was always made the chief because he had cunning. Other mags could do either white or black magic but the mag who had cunning and canning could do both white and black and was the chief of the Initiates. Man with real cunning is man without quotation marks. Angel can do only one thing. Devil can do all.’ (July 18th 1936, Notes, 42-43).

A month later he says: “Both cunning and canning are necessary to all things. This is why there are two magics. Black magic is cunning – often also is cunning and canness – you understand the difference? Black magic is ideal for being. Cunning and can-ness is like conscious and unconscious, or like two words used in Bible for meaning two kinds of evil voluntary and involuntary sin”. (Notes 49).

Gurdjieff continued to teach pupils his mix of esoteric ideas and occult practices. He was at pains to present himself in his writings and in his oral teachings in the roles of both Black and White Magician. He never sought to present himself as solely good, or other than he was which was capable of both constructive and destructive relations with his pupils. I suggest that this duality is fundamental to his teaching because he is an embodiment of his Law of Three, showing the good and bad possibilities open to a human beings and how these may be reconciled.

Some of the methods that Gurdjieff used to hypnotised and entangled his pupils were:
intense pressures
conflicting demands
contradictory teachings
exhausting physical efforts
lack of sleep
use of alcohol and drugs
and fasts

The demands of both Gurdjieff’s writings and oral teachings entangle the reader or listener in hypnotic paradox and contradiction . The demand for students to observe themselves was contradicted by the teaching that they were mechanical and unable to ‘do’. The statement that pupils must have a critical mind was subverted by belonging to a regime in which they had agreed to be incapable of ‘doing’ and therefore of being critical. The constant demand for ‘making effort’ was reinforced by Gurdjieff’s instruction that leaving the teaching before having reached a certain stage would be injurious. It would be better for pupils to die making ‘super-efforts’ than to continue living their mechanical lives. He stressed that the teaching was dangerous. Pupils could not avoid danger, they had to face either the danger of the teaching, or of leaving it. Gurdjieff’s teaching always took place in the last chance saloon.

But he did repeatedly warn pupils against taking his cosmological ideas literally (Wellbeloved, 2003: 216-17). He also gave clues. The astute reader or listener will find the contradictions and begin to question the texts and maybe also the teaching. The process of freeing themselves from this hypnotised state might also free pupils from much of their usual mechanically hypnotised state and allow them to connect with their subconscious (Webb 1980: 560-573). Entanglement and liberation are two ends of the same stick. One of the properties that Gurdjieff defined as belonging to the subconscious is ‘confrontative criticism’ (Tales 568). Or to express it differently, they might be able to define themselves and the world around them in terms other than those used by Gurdjieff.

Ignoring the contradictions, both those created by him and those arising in his life, the pupil may defeat the point of the teaching. Gurdjieff himself usually made sure the pupil ‘got it’ that is could not ignore the contradictions inherent in his teaching by ‘orphaning’ pupils, sending them away, behaving to them in such a way that they chose to go, or by simply disbanding the whole group. This forced pupils to reassess him the teaching and themselves (The Fourth Way, i.e. Gurdjieff’s teaching is never permanent, Search: 312).

3.
Present day omissions and redefinitions of the Work
Once the Magus dies, his presence as embodiment is not longer there and his teaching ends. Thus, he has to be reinvented and his teaching restructured and this has happened. Gurdjieff and his teaching have inevitably been institutionalised and redefined.

Today, in foundations (organisations set up after Gurdjieff’s death by his successor Jeanne de Salzmann) and other groups, as far as I have discovered, there is no focus on Gurdjieff’s use of:
Magic,
Hypnotism,
Narcotics and other drugs.
While the teaching was defined by Gurdjieff as a dangerous but quick way to acquire knowledge, membership is now for long periods, or for life. The effort required is not ‘dangerous’. The pupil is focused on ‘searching’ rather than ‘finding’, ‘receiving’ rather than ‘stealing’ or ‘making efforts’ (See https://gurdjieffbooks.wordpress.com/ “Doing” and Not Doing” on the Joseph Azize page where he gives examples of the passive form of language used in the 1980s by a Foundation work teacher.). Gurdjieff is generally presented in a version ‘cleansed’ of occult practices. For example, the website of the New York Foundation does not include Herald in its list of Gurdjieff’s writings (http://www.gurdjieff-foundation-newyork.org/work2.html ).

The foundations have remained secretive and closed to general scrutiny. There are ‘not for public release books and videos’, one of the videos I have seen presents Gurdjieff in a romanticised sepia vision of his life as related in Meetings, where none of the contradictions of his life or teaching are mentioned. The Work has now spread out and become more widely known in versions that are entwined with other teachings (see Wellbeloved ‘Changes in G. I. Gurdjieff’s Teaching ‘The Work’ http://www.cesnur.org/2001/london2001/wellbeloved.htm A paper presented at The 2001 Conference (CESNUR-INFORM) in London).

What we might ask now is: why is there a reluctance to mention occult practices, magic, hypnotism and the use of drugs in this teaching, not only by the teacher/practitioners but also by scholars? This is a question that is important for the establishment of the discipline of western esotericism as a whole.

Traces of Gurdjieff as Magus, can be found in pupil memoirs and in Chaos Magic.
He remains fully alive in his roles as both black and white magician in his texts.
—————————

Bibliography

Azize, Joseph, https://gurdjieffbooks.wordpress.com/2008/04/07/doing-and-not-doing/

Bennett, John G. Gurdjieff: Making A New World, London: Turnstone Books, 1976

G. I. Gurdjieff, The Herald of Coming Good, privately published Paris, 1933

All and Everything, Ten Books in Three Series:
First series: An Objectively Impartial Criticism of the Life of Man or Beelzebub’s
Tales to His Grandson, London: Routledge & Keegan Paul, 1950.

Second series: Meetings With Remarkable Men, trans. A. R. Orage, Londond:
Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1963.

Third series: Life is real only then, when “I am”, New York: Duton for Triangle
Editions, 19

Views from the Real World: Early Talks of Gurdjieff: London, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1976, 1sr pub. 1973.

Ouspensky, P. D. In Search of the Miraculous: Fragments of an Unknown Teaching, London:
Arkana, 1987, 1st pub Harcourt Brace and World, 1949.

Peters, Fritz, Gurdjieff: containing Boyhood with Gurdjieff and Gurdjieff Remembered, London:
Wildwood House, 1977 (1st pub. 1965).

Pogson, Beryl Chassereau and Lewis Creed, Unforgotten Fragments, York: Quacks Books, 1994

Solano, Solita, unpublished Notes taken by Solita Solano from 1935 – 1940 in Paris, Beinecke Library, Kathryn Hulme Papers YCAL MSS 22 Box 19, folders 484-93 Solano, Solita 1951-75, n.d.

Versluis, Arthur, Magic and Mysticism,: an Introduction to Western Esotericism, Lantham,
Boulder, New York, Toronto, Plymouth UK: Roman & Littlefield, 2007.

Webb. James, The Harmonious Circle, London: Thames & Hudson, 1980.

Wellbeloved, Sophia, ‘Changes in G. I. Gurdjieff’s Teaching ‘The Work’ 2001 CESNUR-Inform
Conference in London. http://www.cesnur.org/2001/london2001/wellbeloved.htm
Gurdjieff: the Key Concepts, London & New York: Routledge, 2003.